Still Loving “Love It or List It” on HGTV

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything on this site so apologies dear readers.

My latest fix on the ever-popular HGTV channel is a Monday night show called Love It or List It. Homeowners have the opportunity to remodel their home with a designer while a realtor helps them look for a better place. In the end, they have to decide if they like the remodel enough to stay or if they prefer the new place the realtor has found for them. There’s a lot of bickering that goes on and and couples taking sides with either the designer or the realtor and it seems like everyone’s always mad at each other. Ok, it’s drama and meant to keep you guessing ’til the very end to see what they decide to do.

My biggest annoyance is that these people have no clue in terms of what their money will get in a remodel — what century are they living in? This week’s homeowner had a budget of $18,000 to fix issues on every floor of their house. Are you serious? Where do you get these people from? Maybe it’s all part of the drama and the conflict that’s built into the show to keep you hooked, but I’m ready to tell some of these people to get a clue. And of course, as in any remodel, there’s always that unexpected surprise that eats away at the budget — usually something structural or electrical that you never see in the finished product so you always wonder where the money went.

But at the end of each show, everyone’s happy no matter which decision is made. And yes, I’ll continue to watch again next week since it’s DVR’d on my cable box.

The hotel lobby

I love hotel lobbies because they definitely set the tone for your selected home-away-from-home. I’ve walked my way through the grandest of the grand and through the dowdiest of dumps. From the sleekest of sleek to ornate design of centuries gone by. From the boldest and most colorful palettes to the monochromatic tones of understated simplicity. The pictures below are in the dezine of modern contemporary with the biggest statement radiating from the magnificent fireplace and architectural chimney fixture over head. Mix in bold artistic  pieces draped from the ceiling, to free-standing wood-paneled walls and beaded-flowing walls that define spaces, there’s something around every corner of this hotel lobby to admire.

A wonderful find for the Patio — Part II

As promised, here are pics of the patio and the flowers in their planters.

A Quiet Corner

Nestled in the corner of the living sits my favorite piece of furniture, a Le Corbusier chaise reproduction from European Furniture Warehouse, paired nicely with an Eileen Gray steel and glass table and a drum-shade floor lamp, both from Room and Board. I finished the vignette with a garage sale find — a simple black telephone, complete with rotary dial. It was only $5 and I had to have it.

It’s a wonderful spot to relax and gaze out the window or enjoy the latest news with my handy iPad. Ever since I saw this chaise in a magazine years ago, I knew I had to have it for that “perfect corner” in the house. What makes it a fantastic piece of furniture is the timeless, yet modern quality in the simple, curving dezine that was born during the 1920s. The same holds true for the Eileen Gray end table  inspired by the original from the 1920s — glass and steel, just the right amount of sparkle and timeless.

Truffles too beautiful to eat, maybe…

You’re probably asking yourself, what do truffles have to do with dezine?  Go with it for a second and just take a look… My philosophy is that dezine can manifest itself in so many ways around us, even in food. During a recent food trade show, I stumbled upon this beautiful display of truffles and you have to admit, each one is a work of art. Before you can even get to the bliss of placing a truffle in your mouth and savoring the creamy morsel, there was extensive thought placed into the look, the feel, the overall shape and appearance of each — beautiful dezines that draw you in. Vibrant colors, unique patterns and textures, who knew that a piece of chocolate could get any better?

Best regards, DPC

Wine and Dine

I am fortunate enough to have a properly defined dining room but without the traditional four walls closing it in. The space opens itself up onto the living room on one side, but there are two steps leading down to it with a railing that adds additional separation without closing in the room. Three glass pendant lights hover over the length of the table and can be dimmed as needed.

Above — The glass and steel-base table is a Le Corbusier adaptation I picked up from European Furniture Warehouse in Chicago. I flanked it with 6 leather chairs, also from European Furniture Warehouse. For additional seating, I added a black leather and steel bench from Room and Board (see photo below).

Below — the sideboard on the right is actually something I discovered in a garage sale in the neighborhood and which I had stained to a rich chocolate color and had new pulls added. I added “tree” decals to the feature wall to add a touch of whimsy. Photography by Audrey Photo Design.


Head Turner!

I stumbled upon this at a trade show (for food of all places). Definitely caught my eye given dinosaur/aquatic-monster dezine applied onto a motor bike. This is one case where a picture speaks for itself. Enjoy!

Look Up, Part II

I’ve been noticing more and more wood appearing on ceilings — take a look at the image below from a hotel lobby. I like the curvature and canopy effect it brings to the indoor space, even to help define the spaces below.

Granted, while it’s more sculptural in nature, it’s a way to take what you traditionally see underfoot and bring it overhead in a different fashion. I’ve also seen where designers have taken wood flooring and have run it up the wall and some have even attached it to the ceiling to give the room a different dimension and more impact when you look up.

Up and Down, Up and Down

I know, they’re just stairs — a means of moving from one level to another within your home. But as part of any home remodel and something so visible to your guests, it’s an area you can’t neglect. From the onset, the dezine vision was pretty clear — remove the carpet, change the rail because it looked too much like outdoor iron gates and change the steps and risers to hardwood, stained in dark espresso.

Simple right? Not so much when modern/contemporary is the style. Do you know how hard it is to source modern stair rails? After a long search, I was able to find a local supplier that sold customized modern railings. I love stainless steel and wanted to combine it with wood handrails that coordinated with the espresso, hardwood floors.

The result? I’ll let you judge for yourself, but I think it turned out pretty nice!

Best regards, DPC

Look up

When it comes to the topic of paint and ceilings, there are several schools of thought. Some say paint it white, others like myself suggest painting it similar to the wall color or a lighter tone of the wall color. If you have normal height ceilings around 8 feet, I say take that wall color and continue it on the ceiling. It tricks the eye and it becomes harder to know where the walls meet the ceiling — making the room look taller since there are no harsh breaks. And based on the darkness of your paint color and the atmosphere you’re trying to achieve, this could also give the room a more intimate look and feel.

Now, if you’re concerned that it may be too dark or claustrophobic, select a color that’s several shades lighter than your wall color for the ceiling — at least the two colors are in the same family. The final factor for me also boils down to the amount of natural light that comes into the room and/or the amount of lighting you’ll be able to install. Bottom line, there’s no right or wrong answer, but just make sure that in the end, you’re happy with the look. And besides, it’s just paint!

Best regards, DPC

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